Spanish Verbs: Future Perfect

The future perfect tense is used to describe an action that "will have happened" in the future. It expresses what a person "will have" been doing at some future point. It can also express probability (what "might have" happened). It is formed by combining the simple future tense of the verb haber with the past participle. (Note: even though the verb tener means "to have", it is not used to form the future perfect.)

To form the future simple perfect tense, the verb "haber" is conjugated as follows:

  • habré (I will have)
  • habrás (you will have)
  • habrá (you/he/she will have)
  • habremos (we will have)
  • habréis (you will have)
  • habrán (you/they will have)

Future perfect for actions that will have been completed

The future perfect is used to express actions that "will have been completed" in the future before another action is completed. Read and listen to the following examples, then repeat each out loud.

I will have finished my homework by the end of the week.
Habré terminado mi tarea para el fin de semana.
You will have already ordered dinner when I arrive at the restaurant.
Ya habrás pedido cuando yo llegue al restaurante.
You will have walked one hundred miles by July.
Usted habrá caminado cien millas para este Julio.
We will have studied math for four years by the end of this year.
Nosotros habremos estudiado matemáticas por quatro años a finales de este año.
They will have eaten all the food by the end of the night.
Ellos habrán comido toda la comida al final de la noche.

Future perfect to express probability

The future perfect is used to express probability, likelihood, or supposition. It can be used to indicate what "might have" or "probably has" happened. Read and listen to the following examples, then repeat each out loud.

She might have gone to another store.
Ella habrá ido a otra tienda.
You might have received a ticket.
habrás recibo una multa.
They may have been thirsty by lunch time.
Ellos habrán tenido sed para la hora de comer.
I might have forgotten where she lives.
Yo habré olivado donde vive ella.


When object pronouns are used with the future perfect, the simple perfect tense of the verb haber and past participle used to form the future perfect are never separated. In the future perfect the object pronoun is always placed immediately before the conjugated verb haber. Read and listen to the following examples, then repeat each one out loud.

Mark will already have given the money to his son.
Marco ya le habrá dado el dinero a su hijo.
They will not have given the gifts to the children.
Ellos no les habrán dado ningúnos regalos a los niños.


With reflexive verbs, the reflexive pronoun is always placed immediately before the conjugated verb haber. Read and listen to the following examples, then repeat each one out loud.

I will have washed my hair.
Me habré lavado el pelo.
They will not have washed their hands.
Ellos no se habrán lavado las manos.


The following are more examples of how to use the future perfect tense by combining the simple perfect tense of the verb haber and the past participle. Read and listen to each example, then repeat each one out loud.

Will the students have already arrived?
¿Habrán llegado ya los estudiantes?
By chance, have you already eaten?
¿Habrás comido ya?
Will the parents not have already arrived?
¿No habrán llegado los padres ya?
We will have finished the test before tomorrow.
Habremos terminado el examen antes de mañana.
Might they have gone already?
¿Habrán ido ya?
Will you have bought a car by the end of the month?
¿Habrás comprado un coche por el fin del mes?
We will have returned from South America by winter.
Habremos vuelto de America del Sur por el invierno.
By the time the babysitter arrives, we will already have left.
Para cuando la niñera llegue, nosotros ya habremos salido.